10 Renovation Trends You’ll be Seeing a Lot of in 2022


As much as we willed 2021 to be a return to “normal”—or at least a departure from 2020—the year was still an uphill battle full of uncertainty. Some of us slowly returned to an office, which we inhabited only part-time. New commutes began from pandemic-acquired country homes or suburban houses. We tested the waters of in-person hangouts, parties, and vacations. Ultimately, we still spent a lot of time at home. So, what will 2022 bring? It’s hard to say. But to get those dream lists and projects ideating, we tapped 16 experts—from an array of interiors backgrounds—to tell us their home renovation predictions for the new year. Let’s keep on renovating in 2022!

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Investments in the home office

“There will be an increase in home offices—homeowners are trading kitchen counters for more professional dedicated spaces. The Zoom fatigue is real, but so is the realization that the backdrop for those visual calls needs to step up. Allocating space for a home office often involves a reset of the room’s function. For example, sitting rooms off of bedrooms or smaller family rooms are converted. Guest rooms also do double duty, with sleepers and desks.” —Jean Brownhill, founder of Sweeten

“We are all becoming more aware of how the layout and aesthetics of a room can affect our energy and productivity. Transforming a current room into your new home office space is not just a fun project, but a necessity for many people who work remotely. When trying to boost the functionality of a home, this room may be at the forefront. People will spend more time and effort in designing a unique working space to maximize their concentration, motivation, and productivity this year.” —Farris Wu, founder and CEO at DecorMatters

“Remember the days of home offices and dining rooms being the first rooms you see when entering a home? Well, those days are back and we’re getting excited about the requests we’re getting from clients focused on creating the perfect home office space. Once unused rooms such as secondary living spaces and breakfast rooms are now being transformed into custom office spaces with built-ins and high-tech solutions such as smart boards, projectors, and wet bars.” —Devin Shaffer, lead interior designer at Decorilla Online Interior Design

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Enhanced outdoor spaces and features

“We’ve been bringing the indoors out for a while now, and one of the best ways to accomplish that from a functional perspective is to introduce shade structures like awnings. We see more people making plans for this, as outdoor renovations continue to be a priority as we approach 2022. Aesthetically pleasing shade structures like awnings not only provide comforting protection from the sun, but also help make an outdoor space feel more connected and beautiful. Look for fabrics with the seal of recommendation from the Skin Cancer Foundation, which recognizes safe and effective U.V. sun protection.” —Kirk Fitzsimmons, director of industrial sales at Sunbrella

“Outdoor spaces continue to be in the spotlight with people spending more time at home. Outdoor showers work in all climates and have controls that allow complete control of water flow and temperature. Outdoor showers can be created in a variety of ways, and, typically, the all-in costs are under $1K for most designs. We’re loving the more sculptural and architectural styles that include features such as benches and stone flooring and walls.” —Devin Shaffer, lead interior designer at Decorilla Online Interior Design

“Homeowners are also investing in outdoor rooms. Pools, water features, outdoor kitchens, fire pits, and extensive seating and dining areas are high on wish lists. Materials are more organic and natural, such as ipe and travertine. Outdoor kitchens will feature commercial-style grills, refrigerators, and wine coolers. Indoor rooms opening up to terraces with a series of French doors or doors that fold back is another way to connect with the outside.” —Jean Brownhill, founder of Sweeten

“In 2022, we anticipate seeing more and more photos on Houzz of outdoor living rooms that look like indoor rooms. Houzz search data has shown that people want their backyards to be relaxing extensions of their interior living spaces. There have been major advances in outdoor materials in recent years, allowing manufacturers to create stylish and durable outdoor sofas, tables, rugs, chairs and decor. Add an outdoor fireplace, maybe a TV, and the line between indoors and out seemingly disappears.” —Mitchell Parker, senior editor at Houzz

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Texture all around

“Texture is the biggest trend I see for 2022. Say goodbye to flat finish drywall and say hello to a surface you want to run your hands over or engage with in a tactile way. Faux finishing has exploded onto the market recently with the advent of materials and processes that make tackling home projects and updates more approachable from a cost and skill perspective. Faux finishing is when you use applied materials to mimic installed materials. A popular use of this technique is creating a faux brick wall, and, if done well, you can barely spot the difference. Homeowners often opt for using a faux finish to achieve the look of Venetian plaster or to mimic concrete or marble.” —David Steckel, Thumbtack home expert


“We’re loving the array of textures found in wallpaper and new lines of paint. We’re finding that clients have become bored with basic paint for wall applications and are now looking for dimension and visual interest. Grasscloth is a great option for more traditional and transitional spaces and brings a soft, subtle yet dimensional addition to a room. We’re also seeing new lines of 3D wall panels popping up, which designers are loving for modern and contemporary projects.” —Devin Shaffer, lead interior designer at Decorilla Online Interior Design

“Textured fabrics are here to stay: Textured fabrics are here to stay. Cream bouclé was huge in 2021, and you see cream textured upholstery everywhere! Different colorways, such as sage greens, pale yellows, pale grays, and blues will be seen in 2022. Texture adds a feeling of warmth to the home, and we tend to gravitate towards tactile and soft-to-the-hand fabrics.” —Peti Lau, trend expert at Kaiyo and interior designer

“Interesting materials are taking a front seat. People are excited about making a sophisticated statement that represents their style and personality. Raw metals and other paneling are frequent requests on our modern and contemporary projects. Natural wood textures with a patina tone are being used more and more on our farmhouse projects and some of our more traditional home projects. With material options these days that can simply be placed on top of existing walls without expensive structural work, people can make a huge transformation without a monstrous investment.” —Matt Mosher, cofounder of Dzinly

“Using textures in the built environment gives it soul. You want to touch and connect with it, adding a fifth dimension to the experience. The tactile nature of materials brings a richness to how a space affects us.” —Jhoiey Ramirez, principal of the Sycamore Collective

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Technology from start to finish

“We expect the interior design industry in 2022 to make huge advancements in terms of technology. Digital interior design was already rising before COVID, and now that designers and homeowners have practiced social distancing, we see the efficiency of online interior design becoming even bigger in 2022. We also expect home decor apps, design firms, etcetera, to implement technological changes to their business plan for 2022, as the industry is ever shifting towards newer technologies. Virtual staging can be done online and easily, as well as furniture shopping with 3D models. Even companies like DecorMatters are implementing artificial intelligence to automatically recommend products to individuals. During 2020, people began turning to their homes as the place for creativity and personalization and therefore capitalized on promoting comfort, character, and bright colors.” —Farris Wu, founder and CEO at DecorMatters


“Let’s face it. We’re all on our phones, tablets, and computers more than we’d like to admit. The truth is, we don’t just use them for fun or to entertain the kids anymore. We use our devices for work, for school, video conferencing, and even to make our homes smarter. I’m expecting to see clients asking for specialized outlets like the Ultra-Fast Plus Power Delivery with USB-C, or the pop-out outlet from Legrand. These types of outlets allow faster charging and a sleeker appearance due to no longer needing an adapter, and everyone wants that.” —Breegan Jane, interior designer and Legrand brand ambassador

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Going bold

“I think we’ll be seeing a lot more wallpaper because of the ease homeowners experience when having it installed or swapped out and the freedom it offers to show off your personality. Current trends show homeowners using wallpaper with bold patterns in rooms where they want to experiment with color and texture. I especially think we’ll continue to see this in nurseries and children’s rooms.” —David Steckel, Thumbtack home expert

“2021 was a year where people expressed their individuality through unique colors, which can provide emotion and feeling to a room! Additionally, last year brought awareness of individual mental health and wellness. With that being said, color therapy is on the rise. Popular colors we expect to see include pinks, burnt oranges, and peacock blues to represent a tropical getaway, as well as greens to mirror nature’s elements. There will be more unique color contrasts in the kitchen, between the countertops and backsplash, or the cabinets and the island. With the rise and focus on creating a home we love to stay in, people will want to bring as much life to their indoor space as possible in 2022—color is an amazing and affordable way to do so.” —Farris Wu, founder and CEO at DecorMatters


“Dark is the new white. For the last several years, white has been a dominant force in color choice for both new homes and exterior renovation. We are seeing a strong interest in dark neutrals and naturals. For example, natural wood paneling with a dark stain or changing from a light-colored house to a bold, dark gray are becoming increasingly popular. We expect this trend to continue gaining traction for the foreseeable future. Sherwin-Williams Urbane Bronze, Benjamin Moore Black Knight, Sherwin-Williams Iron Ore and Benjamin Moore Iron Mountain are excellent darks with a timeless hue.” —Matt Mosher, cofounder of Dzinly

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Creating side-hustle spaces

“2022 will also see the rise of the “side-hustle bedroom.” With an entrepreneurial mindset, especially for Gen Z and Millennials making everything from candles to hats, the bedroom will take on flexible layers of activity, from filming set to creative studio, warehouse to shipment facility. Whether creating or promoting products, or just shooting TikTok videos, bedroom aesthetics for younger generations become backdrops for personal branding.” —Gemma Riberti, head of interiors at WGSN Lifestyle & Interiors


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Being green, literally and figuratively

“I think greens will be a huge factor in home renovations in 2022. People want their homes to feel fresh but still comforting, and green is the perfect paint color to create that feeling! I recently remodeled my own bedroom with Sherwin-Williams Evergreen Fog SW 9130 and I love the tone it sets for the space.” —Beth Diana Smith, founder of Beth Diana Smith Interior Design

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